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Confusing Wage and Sick Time Laws

August 9th, 2017

“I know we have to follow the minimum wage laws and the sick leave laws but it’s very confusing. I network with other business owners and we all seem to do something different. What is the law?”

Your HR Survival Tip

Yes, it’s confusing because there is a state law and 22 California localities have added different local laws. This means you may need different rules for different employees based on where they actually perform their work. It doesn’t help that both state and local laws may also have differences based on the size of your company.

Using a federal contractor … Click here to read on >>

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

7 Employee Handbook Must Haves

August 3rd, 2017

Every business needs an employee handbook.

If you don’t have one, then you need to contact your HR department ASAP. There are so many important sections in an employee handbook but I’ll focus on the 7 essentials today.

7 Must Haves for an Employee Handbook:

  1. Code of Conduct

You must have clear expectations laid out in writing for specific behaviors, dress code, attendance and a variety of other policies.  The only way to have clear expectations is to put them in writing.

  1. At Will Disclaimer

Be sure to have an “at will employment disclaimer” in your handbook.  Everyone needs to understand that the employment is not forced but at will and is at the discretion of the employer.

  1. Family Medical Leave Act

An employee handbook is not complete without the FMLA regulations defined.  Companies with more than 50 employees are required to comply with 12 weeks of unpaid leave each year.

  1. Harassment and Discrimination Policies

The details of these polices are essential.  The goal is set expectations and alleviate any potential fears or concerns for your employees.  Everyone wants to feel at ease in the workplace and a policy that explains what is permissible is quite helpful.

  1. Confidentiality

Each company’s handbook should have wording that ensures your employee’s personal info will be kept confidential.   This should protect the info about them during and after they leave the company.

  1. Leave of Absence

Employees want to know the details about vacation days, sick days, bereavement, paid time off and the days a business closes.  Don’t assume that they will know what you mean.  Be very specific and include the hours of operation and specific dates that you are open and closed.

  1. Compensation and Benefits

Your employee handbook should explain the pay schedule, benefits package, overtime policy, review and salary increase information.  Try and be as direct and detailed in this as possible so that there will be fewer questions later.

If you don’t have an employee handbook for your company, then get that corrected quickly!  Set a goal and get one written.

Already have one?  Well pull it out, dust it off and see if these 7 “Must Haves” are in there.  A yearly revamp is a great idea to be sure that the handbook stays updated with the best info.

Take time right now to review your employee handbook is up to date. If you need any help or guidance, please let us know. We work in this area daily at The Lawton Group and we are Ready to Serve.

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Written for us by our associate Gary Sorrell, Sorrell Associates, LLC. Copyright protected. All rights reserved worldwide.

What Were You Paid?

July 7th, 2017

“When I’m trying to hire new employees, I always ask what they most recently earned.  If they won’t tell me, should I end the interview?”

California and a few other states are considering bills that will prevent employers from asking about previous salary history.  Why? Because there are two situations where salary history has caused enough concern for states to consider making it illegal to ask. www.HRJungle.com

Need help? Contact us today!

Are There Cassandras in Your Organization?

June 14th, 2017

 

 

 

Are There Cassandras in Your Organization?

 

 

By: Don Phin

(read on site)

I listened to a fascinating podcast interview with James Altucher and R.P. Eddy, co-author of the book Warnings: Finding Cassandras to Stop Catastrophes. Co -author Richard A. Clarke has written many what I will call disaster or warning books. While I’m not big on being a pessimist (it’s too damn depressing) it makes sense to move forward with eyes wide open. Essentially Cassandras (named after the mythological figure who could foresee future disasters but nobody would believe her) are people who have been ignored when it came to HIV, Katrina, recession of 2008, Fukushima and other disasters. Current concerns include pandemics, the rise of AI, nuclear winters, sea level rise, meteor strikes, vulnerability of the Internet of Everything, and more. Again, I know these things are out there…and so do you. It may be my foolish choice but I’m not going prepper any time soon. At the same time I won’t be reckless and will take any reasonable steps. But…I am fascinated by the idea of the Cassandra. They remind me of the Whistle-blowers (mostly engineers) I represented in my career. Question: Are you paying attention to these people in your organization? According to Altucher’s summary, J.P. says (with my notes in parenthesis.)

  • Cassandras are data driven. Everybody in our book who was right was a proven, technical expert on the topic they were speaking about. (Who are those wonks at your company? What are they saying about things?)
  • They are questioners by personality. They ask hard questions and doubt what most believe. (Which means they can be a real PITA. “Do you have to question everything I say?”)
  • They have an off-putting personality…not always, but it’s common. (Engineers are good at this. So are lawyers. Ever tried arguing with either one?)
  • They have a sense of personal responsibility. “When they walk into a restaurant and the fire alarm goes off, they’re the one who says to everybody, ‘Let’s get out of here,” R.P. Said. “These guys think of themselves as sheepdogs. … it’s their job to protect us.” (Which means they can be trusted but controlling.)
  • They have high anxiety. “Let’s go back to our fire alarm example. These are the guys who look for the fire exits when they walk in. They’re the people who pull the fire alarm when they smell smoke. And when you think about personalities, a lot of people don’t do that.” (Making them great as risk managers and horrible travel companions.)
  • (And I will add- they are not just men.)

I not only litigated whistle-blower cases, I also created company ethics programs and reporting structures. I recommend companies consider Employee Confidential. You want to encourage people to come forth. In my experience, the only people who don’t buy into that approach are those who have a reason to fear exposure. I have zero empathy for them. I also listened to a podcast of the annual Berkshire Hathaway meeting. I was once again impressed by the intelligence of all who spoke but most impressed about the openness of Buffett and Munger to the doubters. To the Cassandras… be they reporters, shareholders or other experts. They wanted that challenge, that feedback, that dialogue. And in public in front of tens of thousands of people where there is no place to hide. Because there is no place to hide. Would you be so bold? Warning: when you are not open to the Cassandra’s input you will be the last to know. And you will pay the price.

 

Don Phin, Esq. 619.852.4580 cell 3200 Fourth Ave., Suite 208 San Diego, Ca 92103 www.donphin.com www.greathr.com www.hrsherpas.com

HR News – Tears and Anger

June 14th, 2017
You are receiving this because you subscribed or you know an HR Jungle “Guide.” You may unsubscribe any time using the link at the bottom of this email.

 
Tears and Anger

“I have an employee who gets very emotional whenever I let them know they’ve made an error or try to tell them how to do something better. How do I deal with someone like this?”

Your HR Survival Tip

Dealing with emotional employees is often stressful for managers. It doesn’t matter whether you’re getting tears or anger, the emotion makes it hard to get your point across to the employee.

Often the employee is so wrapped up in their emotion, they have stopped listening to you. This means the problem is likely to occur again instead of being corrected. How do you get past this so you don’t end up repeating the situation time over time? There are two things that can help. The first thing is you stand up.

CJ Westrick at HR Jungle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Labor and Employment Alert: Changing Coure: Department of Labor Withdraws Recent Guidance on Independent Contractors and Joint Employers

June 8th, 2017

http://www.vorys.com/publications-2001.html Today, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced that it is withdrawing two Administrator’s Interpretations on joint employment and independent contractors that were issued under the Obama administration. Both interpretations had the potential to increase employers’ liability for misclassification and for wage-hour penalties for being deemed a joint employer. In 2015, … Read more of the article here: https://peocompass.com/labor-employment-alert-changing-course-department-labor-withdraws-guidance-independent-contractors-joint-employers/
Posted by PEO Compass

Who is Doing What?

June 7th, 2017

“A couple of my employees don’t finish their tasks or miss deadlines fairly frequently.  They always have a reason they’re aren’t to blame.  How can I get them to take responsibility for their job?”  CJ Westrick @ HRJungle.com

Reasons for Termination

May 31st, 2017

“I want to fire an employee but would rather just say he’s being laid off.  How do I explain it to him/her?”

http://blog.hrjungle.com/

Good information as usual from our friend CJ Westrick.  If you have any staffing needs or questions please do give us a call.  Judy Lawton CEO, The Lawton Group  858-569-6260

 

When Not To Pay Employees

February 28th, 2017

“This recent storm resulted in a loss of power at the shop so I closed early. I need to know whether or not I have to pay employees for the full day when it wasn’t my fault they couldn’t work.”

Harassment is a BIG deal and can land you in very hot water!

September 30th, 2016

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