RSS Facebook LinkedIn

Confusing Wage and Sick Time Laws

August 9th, 2017

“I know we have to follow the minimum wage laws and the sick leave laws but it’s very confusing. I network with other business owners and we all seem to do something different. What is the law?”

Your HR Survival Tip

Yes, it’s confusing because there is a state law and 22 California localities have added different local laws. This means you may need different rules for different employees based on where they actually perform their work. It doesn’t help that both state and local laws may also have differences based on the size of your company.

Using a federal contractor … Click here to read on >>

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

7 Employee Handbook Must Haves

August 3rd, 2017

Every business needs an employee handbook.

If you don’t have one, then you need to contact your HR department ASAP. There are so many important sections in an employee handbook but I’ll focus on the 7 essentials today.

7 Must Haves for an Employee Handbook:

  1. Code of Conduct

You must have clear expectations laid out in writing for specific behaviors, dress code, attendance and a variety of other policies.  The only way to have clear expectations is to put them in writing.

  1. At Will Disclaimer

Be sure to have an “at will employment disclaimer” in your handbook.  Everyone needs to understand that the employment is not forced but at will and is at the discretion of the employer.

  1. Family Medical Leave Act

An employee handbook is not complete without the FMLA regulations defined.  Companies with more than 50 employees are required to comply with 12 weeks of unpaid leave each year.

  1. Harassment and Discrimination Policies

The details of these polices are essential.  The goal is set expectations and alleviate any potential fears or concerns for your employees.  Everyone wants to feel at ease in the workplace and a policy that explains what is permissible is quite helpful.

  1. Confidentiality

Each company’s handbook should have wording that ensures your employee’s personal info will be kept confidential.   This should protect the info about them during and after they leave the company.

  1. Leave of Absence

Employees want to know the details about vacation days, sick days, bereavement, paid time off and the days a business closes.  Don’t assume that they will know what you mean.  Be very specific and include the hours of operation and specific dates that you are open and closed.

  1. Compensation and Benefits

Your employee handbook should explain the pay schedule, benefits package, overtime policy, review and salary increase information.  Try and be as direct and detailed in this as possible so that there will be fewer questions later.

If you don’t have an employee handbook for your company, then get that corrected quickly!  Set a goal and get one written.

Already have one?  Well pull it out, dust it off and see if these 7 “Must Haves” are in there.  A yearly revamp is a great idea to be sure that the handbook stays updated with the best info.

Take time right now to review your employee handbook is up to date. If you need any help or guidance, please let us know. We work in this area daily at The Lawton Group and we are Ready to Serve.

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Written for us by our associate Gary Sorrell, Sorrell Associates, LLC. Copyright protected. All rights reserved worldwide.

Harassment is a BIG deal and can land you in very hot water!

September 30th, 2016

Read the rest of this entry »

10 Employee Training Tips

February 8th, 2011

Well-trained employees are the key to your small business success. Studies have shown that the most successful, productive employees are those who have received extensive training. They’re the cream of the crop, and often have the strongest stake in the company’s future.

In an ideal world, you would be able to hire people who already possess the exact skills your business needs. But in today’s competitive labor market, demand for skilled workers far exceeds supply.

That’s where training comes in. Not only does instruction arm your employees with needed professional or technical skills, but it also shows that you are invested in them and interested in bringing them with you into the company’s future. This helps keep workers motivated and involved.

To successfully launch an employee-training program in your own company, follow these 10 helpful tips:

  1. Stress training as investment.
    The reason training is often considered optional at many companies is because it is thought of as an expense rather than an investment. While it’s true that training can be costly up front, it’s a long-term investment in the growth and development of your human resources.
  2. Determine your needs.
    As you probably don’t have unlimited time or funds to execute an employee training program, you should decide early on what the focus of your training program should be. Determine what skills are most pertinent to address current or future company needs or ones that will provide the biggest payback. Ask yourself, “How will this training eventually prove beneficial to the company?” Repeat this process as your business needs change.
  3. Promote a culture of learning.
    In today’s fast-paced economy, if a business isn’t learning, it’s going to fall behind. A business learns as its people learn. Communicate your expectations that all employees should take the necessary steps to hone their skills and stay on top of their professions or fields of work. Make sure you support those efforts by providing the resources needed to accomplish this goal.
  4. Get management on board.
    Once you have developed a prioritized list of training topics that address key needs within your company, you need to convince management to rally behind the initiative.
  5. Start out small.
    Before rolling out your training program to the masses, rehearse with a small group of users and gather their feedback. This sort of informal benchmarking exposes weaknesses in your training plans and helps you fine-tune the training process.
  6. Choose quality instructors and materials.
    Who you select to conduct the training will make a major difference in the success of your efforts, whether it’s a professional educator or simply a knowledgeable staff member. Having the right training materials is also important — after the training is over, these materials become valuable resources for trainees.
  7. Find the right space.
    Select a training location that’s conducive to learning. Choose an environment that’s quiet and roomy enough to spread out materials. Make sure the space is equipped with a computer and projector, so you can present a visually stimulating training session.
  8. Clarify connections.
    Some employees may feel that the training they’re receiving isn’t relevant to their job. It’s important to help them understand the connection early on, so they don’t view the training sessions as a waste of valuable time. Employees should see the training as an important addition to their professional portfolios. Award people with completion certificates at the end of the program.
  9. Make it ongoing.
    Don’t limit training solely to new employees. Organized, ongoing training programs will maintain all employees’ skill levels, and continually motivate them to grow and improve professionally.
  10. Measure results.
    Without measurable results, it’s almost impossible to view training as anything but an expense. Decide how you’re going to obtain an acceptable rate of return on your investment. Determine what kind of growth or other measure is a reasonable result of the training you provide. You’ll have an easier time budgeting funds for future training if you can demonstrate concrete results.
©2017 The Lawton Group. Privacy Notice | SITE CREDITS