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How Great Leaders Get More Done In Meetings

December 12th, 2017

 You can tell quite a bit about a leader based on how they conduct meetings.

If you can improve the discussions, solutions, and team morale through team meetings, you’ll be more effective at running your business as a whole.

Consider the following 4 things to get more done in meetings:

1.    Clearly define the purpose.How Great Leaders Get More Done In Meetings

If you can’t establish an objective for a meeting, then you should not hold one. Think through what you would like to convey to your team and accomplish before you schedule the time.

A good rule of thumb is to focus your meeting on S.M.A.R.T goals, which is an acronym for specific, measurable, achievable, results-focused, and time-bound goals. By following this model, you will be able to hold meetings that are beneficial for both your team and the company’s mission.

Meetings should not be a surprise for employees. Send out an agenda in advance for their review so they are prepared to discuss the matters at hand.

2.    Select a decision maker.

Each meeting agenda that is sent out should include the name of a decision maker. This person has a key role because they will help facilitate the follow through and how decisions are carried out.

Leaders must select a decision maker to increase accountability and ensure that action items make it to completion.

3.    Leaders should be role models.

When in a leadership role, your attitude and habits are often reflected amongst the team. Be a good role model. In other words, you’ll want to listen well, be truthful, admit when you’re wrong and ensure that the meeting stays appropriate and on task.

Strong leaders keep commitments. You should always start on time and end on time so that you set clear expectations that are consistent. Staff members will know you mean business and that you respect their time by staying on schedule.

4.    Follow up is essential.

Follow up is an amazing and underutilized tool in many companies today. After each meeting, the leader should send out a memo that recaps the discussion and action items.

You’ll save time, money and have less confusion if you follow up to be sure that everyone is on the same page.

No one wants to waste time in a fruitless meeting where there is no clear purpose or call to action. As a leader, you can accomplish more in meetings if you are intentional, organized, and lead by example.

Remember time is money and should not be wasted! 

Have a fantastic and productive meeting!

We would love to hear from you. Please send us your comments.

The Lawton Group Team

858-569-6260 ~ judy@lawtongrp.com
www.Lawtongrp.com

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

7 Attributes of a Great Management Hire

December 5th, 2017

7 Attributes of a Great Management Hire

Hiring is not an easy feat.

When you try to hire for a manager, the task is even more difficult. The candidate that you select for a management role needs to be passionate, innovative, solution oriented, dynamic and have an exceptional work ethic.

When hiring for a management job you’ll want to look for the following 7 attributes in order to make a great hire.

1.     Positive Attitude

Strong leaders have positive attitudes that show through in their daily actions. They are able to boost employee morale with their pleasant and upbeat energy. Employees see their can-do attitude as refreshing because nothing looks too difficult or too overwhelming with their leadership intact.

2.     Cultural Appreciation

These days a strong cultural appreciation will go a long way in the workplace. Employees appreciate management investing in the culture of the business. Most companies have diverse settings and a manager that embraces and encourages the environment is preferred.

3.     Accountability

Management must embrace being accountable for their decisions and those of their team. Employees respect them and are more loyal for owning up to their responsibilities and accepting accountability.

4.     Honesty is Always Best

Leaders must be honest and transparent at all times in order to be successful. A straightforward management approach fosters better relationships and morale within any team. Be sure to do reference checks on a potential management hire to find out about their character.

5.     Sensitivity

A great management hire should have sensitivity and a keen emotional intelligence. They need to be able to recognize what works and does not for their team members. A sensitive manager would know how to handle each employee and act according to their strengths.

6.     Plenty of Empathy

Outstanding managers are not only considerate but they know how to be empathetic. They consider how they would feel in any situation that they place their employee in. During an interview, ask your candidate how they would handle a personal situation with their team members to help gauge their empathy.

7.     Passion for Learning

The best managers have a passion for learning. They have a constant desire to grow and seek out educational opportunities. Your goal should be to find a lifelong learner so that your business will grow and thrive under their leadership.

You won’t regret taking your time as your hire for a management role. Consider these 7 attributes and you’ll make a solid hire that will add value to your team and company.

We would love to hear your thoughts. Please send them to:

The Lawton Group Team

858-569-6260 ~ judy@lawtongrp.com
www.Lawtongrp.com

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

4 Tips for Marketing to Millennials

November 28th, 2017

4 Tips for Marketing to Millennials

In the United States today, there are over 80 million millennials.

This age group wants to feel connected in their purchasing decisions, so they identify best with less traditional marketing tactics.

They crave a more personalized approach and one that they can relate to. In fact, studies show that millennials don’t trust traditional marketing.

Check out these four tips for marketing to millennials. They are a force to be reckoned with and certainly must be considered when planning how to spend your company’s marketing dollars.

1.     Make Mobile Marketing a Priority

Approximately 85% of millennials use a smartphone so you must have a mobile friendly website in order to capture their attention. More and more they use their phones and tablets instead of a computer when they make their buying decisions.

Use your marketing dollars wisely and be sure that your site’s load times are quick and that there is an obvious call to action for your millennial customer base to embrace with ease.

2.     Get Them Engaged

Most millennials don’t remember life without internet and social media. They thrive best when given the chance to research and that often includes their favorite social media networks as a resource.

In order to effectively market to millennials, you need to engage them by having other millennials spread the word to them. They find their friends a credible source over most face to face interactions or campaigns when it comes to product info.

3.     Don’t Forget the Fun Factor

Millennials just want to have fun and are on a mission to enjoy life. These young consumers like the research process to learn about the product they may purchase. They love the exploration aspect which allows them to have an experience when shopping not just a new item or service.

Wise companies know that millennials want to spend time browsing online and enjoying social media. They market their products in an entertaining way and allow for increased engagement with these young consumers.

4.     Made for Them

Millennials respond to marketing that makes them feel the product was created specifically for them. They don’t want a pushy salesperson but rather information that is presented in a relational way. The youth of today want honesty and transparency which helps them picture that the product is for them.

Millennials love to research and enjoy the experience of products and services. In order to capture their interest, you’ll want to adhere to these marketing tips so that you can gain their trust and loyalty, increasing your customer base at the same time.

We would love to hear your comments. Contact us today!

The Lawton Group Team

858-569-6260 ~ judy@lawtongrp.com
www.Lawtongrp.com

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Minimum Wage Increasing

November 21st, 2017

“Minimum wage used to be simple but now I find I’m constantly confused about it. Am I making it harder than it is?”

Your HR Survival TipMinimum Wage Increasing

It’s no wonder you’re confused… it is confusing! Most of the confusion started when voters approved laws that provide a local, higher minimum wage. Confusing matters more, the state (and some localities) decided to give smaller companies a break by delaying their increases for one year.

This means you can’t just know the state minimum anymore. You now need to know the location of your field employees to ensure you’re meeting the local minimums plus consider the size of your company.

If you have 25 or fewer employees, you may be eligible for a delayed increase. However, the day you have 26 employees on your payroll, you must start using the higher minimum wage… there is no going back even if employee #26 was on your payroll for only a moment. Here’s a quick summary of minimum wages:

  • 1/1/2018 – California increases to $10.50/hour (<25) / $11.00/hour (26+).
  • 1/1/2018 – Cupertino increases to $13.50/hour, all size companies.
  • 1/1/2018 – El Cerrito increases to $13.60/hour, all size companies.
  • 1/1/2018 – Los Altos increases to $13.50/hour, all size companies.
  • 1/1/2018 – Milipitas increases to $12.00/hour, all size companies.
  • 1/1/2018 – Mountain View increases to $15.00/hour, all size companies.
  • 1/1/2018 – Oakland increases but we don’t know the new rate yet.
  • 1/1/2018 – Palo Alto increases to $13.50/hour, all size companies.
  • 1/1/2018 – Richmond increases to $13.00/hour, all size companies.
  • 1/1/2018 – San Jose increases to $13.50/hour, all size companies.
  • 1/1/2018 – San Mateo increases to $13.50/hour, all size companies.
  • 1/1/2018 – Santa Clara increases to $13.00/hour, all size companies.
  • 1/1/2018 – Sunnyvale increases to $15.00/hour, all size companies.
  • 7/1/2018 – Emeryville increases to $15.00/hour (<55) / approximately $15.60/hour (55+).
  • 7/1/2018 – City of Los Angeles increases to $12.00/hour (<25) / $13.25/hour (26+).
  • 7/1/2018 – Los Angeles County increases to $12.00/hour (<25) / $13.25/hour (26+).
  • 7/1/2018 – Malibu increases to $12.00/hour (<25) / $13.25/hour (26+).
  • 7/1/2018 – Pasadena increases to $12.00/hour (<25) / $13.25/hour (26+).
  • 7/1/2018 – San Francisco increases to $15.00/hour, all size companies.
  • 7/1/2018 – San Leandro increases to $13.00/hour, all size companies.
  • 7/1/2018 – Santa Monica increases to $12.00/hour (<25) / $13.25/hour (26+).
  • 10/1/2018 – Berkeley increases to $15.00/hour, all size companies.
  • 2019 – City of San Diego will have an increase.

There are two things to remember: (1) Your employee only needs to work within one of these localities for 2 hours for you to be subject to paying the minimum wage for that location while your worker is there. (2) An increase to the state minimum wage means the minimum salary also increases ($43,680 for <25 or $45,760 for 26+). Double check your payroll to ensure no one is underpaid.

Click here for more.

Your comments are greatly appreciated. Contact us today!

The Lawton Group Team

858-569-6260 ~ judy@lawtongrp.com
www.Lawtongrp.com

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Laws Signed by the Governor

November 14th, 2017

Apparently crossing one’s fingers in hopes the Governor wouldn’t sign all the employment laws put in front of him doesn’t work.

I know this because the following laws were signed and will go into effect in 2018:LAWS SIGNED BY THE GOVERNOR

Parental Leave
SB63 mandates you must allow up to 12 weeks of unpaid time off for parental baby bonding leave. This new law hits companies of 20+ employees but eligibility rules apply. You are also required to maintain and pay for health insurance while the employee is on this leave. This is protected time off so you must give the employee their “same or similar position” upon their return to work. Previously, this type and length of leave were only available for employees of companies with 50+ employees.

Prior Salary History
AB168 will prohibit companies from asking applicants about their prior salary/wages at previous jobs. You may also be penalized for not providing your pay ranges when requested. The concept is to ensure you are paying a fair market value for the position itself rather than basing the wage/salary on what they previously earned. In theory, this may also make it harder for the applicant to ask for a higher wage based on wanting to make as much or more than they were previously earning. Make sure you eliminate the salary question on your employment applications.

Criminal History
AB1008, also known as ban-the-box legislation, prohibits you from asking about criminal history prior to giving the applicant a conditional offer of employment. We believe this means no background check that includes criminal history until after you’ve made a conditional offer. Then the applicant has 5 days to refute what you found if the findings result in a retraction of the offer. Legally, you will have a few hoops to jump through with required documents. This law affects companies with 5+ employees.

One thing these new laws have in common is the need for you to document everything. Some of the documentation will be required by law and the rest is needed to protect your company. While we’ve always recommended documenting, now it’s becoming crucial to avoid penalties and lawsuits.

Click here for more.

Your comments are greatly appreciated. Contact us today!

The Lawton Group Team

858-569-6260 ~ judy@lawtongrp.com
www.Lawtongrp.com

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Sexual Harassment Tips

November 7th, 2017

Often, when people think about sexual harassment, they have images of someone being groped or crude suggestions.

However, in a legal sense, harassment definitions are like The Blob… continuously growing and moving.

The California Chamber of Commerce’s HRCalifornia Extra recently came up with a list we like because it highlights some often overlooked things that might be considered harassment today.

  • Social Media — We now need to pay attention to what co-workers say to other co-workers in social media during or after hours. Just because they post something after work doesn’t mean it can’t feel harassing to the employee receiving the post. And you’ll need to deal with it.
  • Looking — Female employees told me how uncomfortable they were because a male employee was watching them whenever they left or entered the workspace. Staring, glaring, and leering is often offensive but won’t always be harassing, depending on the situation. Just looking at someone isn’t the problem; the problem is when it makes the other person uncomfortable.
  • Field Employees — Whether you have field employees going into other companies or you have another company’s employees coming into your business, you need to be aware of harassment potential. Yes, you can be held liable for allowing someone into your company who harasses one of your employees. Plus, you can be sued if your field employees harasses someone at a client or vendor site.
  • Not Sexually Motivated — There was a court case about several guys making sexual comments to one guy. They said there was no sexual intent so it couldn’t be harassment. The judge disagreed. Harassment is harassment, with or without sexual intent.
  • Consensual Relationship — Office romances happen so how do you tell those who are together by choice versus those who might feel forced into the relationship? Some clients use a written Consensual Relationship Agreement to take harassment off the table. For the rest of you, look for the power… are you aware that one of the people in the relationship might have power over the other? If so, look deeper.
  • Once is Enough — While severe or pervasive behavior may be the standard, it doesn’t mean a single event can’t be harassing if it is severe or blatant enough.
  • Keeping Quiet — Just because a person doesn’t tell someone to stop, doesn’t mean they like what is happening or what they are hearing. They could even laugh when you tell a joke and later file a complaint about that joke.
  • Complaint Format — As a California business, you are now required to have a written Harassment Prevention Policy distributed to all employees. You also need to give employees a way to make a complaint other than in writing. Your managers need to be trained so they can recognize the different forms of potential harassment and report it so you can investigate appropriately.
  • Higher Bar — When writing a harassment policy, have a policy that is more strict than the law. This way you’re dealing with failure to follow your policy before you’re dealing with violating harassment laws.
  • Confidentiality — No matter how much an employee may beg you to keep what they tell you confidentially, it’s just not possible. You can promise to maintain confidentiality as much as possible, but you can’t investigate the claim if you can’t talk to others. Every person in management must know to report potential claims, even if it doesn’t follow the chain of command.

Employees want and deserve to work without being harassed or feeling uncomfortable. You have a legal responsibility to make that happen but the first step is recognizing all the variations of harassment. Consider training every supervisory employee, even if you aren’t legally required to do so. In the end, the cost of training is extremely low compared to the risks resulting from a lack of training. Click here for more.

Your comments are greatly appreciated. Contact us today!

The Lawton Group Team

858-569-6260 ~ judy@lawtongrp.com
www.Lawtongrp.com

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

The Benefits of Teleconferencing

October 31st, 2017

Companies constantly look for new ways to attract the most talented candidates to hire for their open positions.

One way to obtain and keep top talent team members is to embrace technology and encourage them to use it in their work. This technology has been around a while but are you utilizing it fully?

Video conferencing is a popular and excellent communication option for your team. You’ll find this type of meeting is good for employee morale, a low-cost way to meet and a welcome change to the traditional staff meeting.

Employee Morale

The younger generation believes in and trusts technology. Companies that embrace options such as teleconferencing often are able to build trust amongst their employees. By incorporating video conferencing, you’ll be able to increase the confidence your team has in upper management.

Further, your employees will see you as a company that is willing to change, grow, and improve their technology in order to advance their business and team.

Low Cost Way to Meet

Teleconferencing is an easy way to hold a meeting with a large group and not have to come up with a space to squeeze them all into. Technology allows video meetings which saves money because of travel, rented space, refreshments and lost time due to moments of lag before and after the meeting.

Your company can have a full meeting via a teleconference which is a great option and would appeal to a younger generation. They love the flexibility and embrace technology quite willingly.

Mundane Meetings

Another reason that teleconferencing appeals to employees is that it switches up the typical, mundane staff meeting. Often upper management schedules meetings that, over time, their staff begins to dislike and even dread.

Employees don’t want to attend meetings that only elongate their to-do-lists. They don’t like unnecessary meetings that take up their valuable time where they could be getting more accomplished. Top talent craves efficiency and wants to use their time wisely.

Further, the younger generation wants to only pursue the tasks and goals that will make them feel successful. They do not like busy work and crave a sense of accomplishment.

If you want to challenge, grow and stimulate your team, welcome technology into your daily routine. You’ll find that employee morale will improve, you’ll potentially save money and teleconferencing will even help you to replace the typical meeting environment.

Be sure to embrace technology and encourage your team to as well. You’ll see improved results and communication that will benefit your business.

Are you using video conferencing in your business? How much time & money has it saved you?

Your comments are greatly appreciated. Contact us today!

The Lawton Group Team

858-569-6260 ~ judy@lawtongrp.com
www.Lawtongrp.com

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

The Cost of a Bad Hire

October 24th, 2017

When you need to fill a position, you are often in a time crunch and feel urgent. No matter the need, try and slow down to hire well. The cost of a bad hire is both pricey and hurts a variety of other areas of your business.

Costs Associated with a Failed Hire

In the event that you make a hire that doesn’t work out, you’ll find that the costs associated with this unpleasant situation are not just financial.

Other Costs include:

  • Salary loss
  • Recruitment time
  • Training and education
  • Missed deadlines or potential business
  • Team morale
  • Increased supervision

When you think about all those costs, then you’ll want to avoid a bad hire more than anything. Some of the most trying aspects of the above list are recruitment, training and a greater need for supervision.

Recruitment Process

Whether your company recruits themselves or uses an agency, there is a lot of time invested with recruitment. The process can be long, expensive and overwhelming when trying to recruit top talent.

If your company makes a poor hiring choice, you’ll have to go back through the process all over again.

Costs and time spent include:

  • Ad placement
  • References
  • Criminal and credit checks
  • Interviews

Recruitment should be carefully handled and have several people involved in the decision-making process.

Beginning Costs

In the beginning, you’ll spend time with your new hire in training, orientation and completion of new hire paperwork. Since you spend so much upfront time with your new employee, it becomes harder to terminate because you’re left with the hope it will work out.

You’ll save time and money by making a necessary change rather than continuing to invest in someone that is not the right fit.

More Supervision

If you hire and the employee is not performing well, then you’ll have to give them more supervision. The problem with having to supervise more is that you’re not able to complete your own job in a timely fashion. This makes the bad hire more costly, frustrating and even hurts other employee’s performance.

Don’t get so rushed in the hiring process that you make a choice you’ll live to regret. Be sure to do more than one interview, complete your company’s hiring process in full and consider in advance the real costs associated with hiring your candidate.

Your HR department will appreciate your care, effort, and thoroughness in making a solid hire. The paperwork alone with hiring is a lot for any company to complete.

Contact us today for help finding top talent!

The Lawton Group Team
858-569-6260 ~ judy@lawtongrp.com
www.Lawtongrp.com

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

The 10 Biggest Leadership Mistakes to Avoid

October 17th, 2017

Anyone that is a boss, a manager or a leader knows that strong leadership qualities are a must if you and your team are going to succeed.

The 10 Biggest Leadership Mistakes to AvoidThere is so much information out there on how to be a great leader; however, there are also things that should be avoided if you’re in a leadership role.

The 10 biggest leadership mistakes to avoid include:

  1. Forgetting to listen

Leaders have an agenda, a plan and a mission that they are trying to carry out. However, they can sometimes forget to listen to the advice of others. There is wisdom in consulting people for advice and ideas. Listen to those around you and put your heads together.

  1.  Ignoring the details

Leaders can often fixate on the big picture. The only way you can pull off the ultimate goal is to stay the course and note the details that it takes to get there.

In other words, a leader should avoid ignoring the details. They matter and are what helps you to achieve the overall project or mission.

  1. Missing individual successes

Don’t forget to give credit where credit is due. Your team will thrive under a little pat on the back and encouragement. If you miss celebrating individual successes, then you could miss a very important motivator for your team.

  1. Slow to change

Strong leaders should be quick to change if it makes sense.  You gain nothing by making the process slow. If you can make an improvement for your team or company, then go for it.

  1. Being “incognito”

Don’t get lost! Your employees should be able to find you with ease. If they think you are always gone or unavailable, then you will miss opportunities to mentor them.

  1. Skip the micromanaging act

No one likes to be micromanaged. Be sure to hire well and you can skip the constant checking up on them and the getting into every detail.

  1. Not communicating well

The goal should be to inform your staff about what’s happening in the company. The fewer surprises the better for your team. Good communication is important for success.

  1. Making things about you

Don’t make everything about you.  Your team will get annoyed and not respect you. Be sure that you are open to helping the team as a whole rather than just you.

  1. Not admitting your mistakes

Leaders need to admit when they are wrong and make mistakes. Your honesty with the situation will help your team see you as more human and even more approachable.

  1. Not being willing to fire people

Terminating someone’s employment is never a good situation. However, leaders need to be willing to make a change and fire someone when it is warranted.
Leaders should focus on how to lead well but not miss these 10 mistakes to avoid at the same time. Strong leadership is essential to the success of a mission and company.
Contact us today for help finding top talent!

The Lawton Group Team
858-569-6260 ~ judy@lawtongrp.com
www.Lawtongrp.com

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Good and Bad Legal News

October 10th, 2017

 Good and Bad Legal News

There has been activity in two areas regarding employment law in California. One is deemed to be good, even great, news and the other is not so great for smaller companies.

The good news is a court ruling that may affect many of you regarding vacation pay. A company had a policy stating employees earn one week of vacation after one year of employment. When an employee left the company after 6 months, he filed a claim that he was due half the vacation promised after one year.

CA law states earned vacation time is part of the employee’s wages and it is earned each day of work. Vacation time, once earned, cannot be lost… it is used or paid out. If the employee doesn’t use their earned vacation, the total unused time can be limited by a cap that will make the employee stop earning more vacation time until the employee’s balance is below that cap.

A 2009 court case decided the employee was due a portion of the first year’s vacation. However, in that case, the company’s policy stated employees earn one week of vacation during their first year of employment but they couldn’t use it until after one year. Since their way of writing the policy made it clear vacation time was being earned in that first year, the company had to pay out the earned time.

The most recent case was different because their policy specifically stated the employee earned no vacation during the first year of employment. Take a look at how your policy is written and let us help you update it, if needed.

The bad news is that CA’s SB63 has passed through the legislature and is now ready for the governor’s signature. If this bill is made into law, companies with only 20 or more employees will now have to provide employees with up to 12 weeks of unpaid time off each year for family/medical purposes. Currently, similar laws (FMLA, CFRA) only affect companies with 50+ employees.

SB63 provides eligible employees protected time off for certain things, such as baby bonding and medical issues for themselves or family. Pregnant employees would have available both the time off provided in CA’s Pregnancy Disability Leave (up to 3 months) and the 12 weeks available through this bill because they cannot overlap. While you do not pay for any of this time off, the employee could receive supplemental pay from the state for about 3 months while on leave.

Aside from having employees off work for up to 12 weeks, companies will have additional administrative responsibilities in the form of various documents to be sent in a timely manner and tracking the time off related to these leaves. Remember, this is protected time off so hiring someone to fill their position will be on a temporary basis because the employee must be provided with their same or similar job when they return from the leave.

We’ll let you know if the governor signs or vetoes this bill. Even if the bill is vetoed, remember you can still allow employees unpaid time off as a personal leave of absence to accommodate baby bonding or medical leaves for your employees.

… Click here to visit the HR Jungle >>

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
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