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Confusing Wage and Sick Time Laws

August 9th, 2017

“I know we have to follow the minimum wage laws and the sick leave laws but it’s very confusing. I network with other business owners and we all seem to do something different. What is the law?”

Your HR Survival Tip

Yes, it’s confusing because there is a state law and 22 California localities have added different local laws. This means you may need different rules for different employees based on where they actually perform their work. It doesn’t help that both state and local laws may also have differences based on the size of your company.

Using a federal contractor … Click here to read on >>

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

7 Employee Handbook Must Haves

August 3rd, 2017

Every business needs an employee handbook.

If you don’t have one, then you need to contact your HR department ASAP. There are so many important sections in an employee handbook but I’ll focus on the 7 essentials today.

7 Must Haves for an Employee Handbook:

  1. Code of Conduct

You must have clear expectations laid out in writing for specific behaviors, dress code, attendance and a variety of other policies.  The only way to have clear expectations is to put them in writing.

  1. At Will Disclaimer

Be sure to have an “at will employment disclaimer” in your handbook.  Everyone needs to understand that the employment is not forced but at will and is at the discretion of the employer.

  1. Family Medical Leave Act

An employee handbook is not complete without the FMLA regulations defined.  Companies with more than 50 employees are required to comply with 12 weeks of unpaid leave each year.

  1. Harassment and Discrimination Policies

The details of these polices are essential.  The goal is set expectations and alleviate any potential fears or concerns for your employees.  Everyone wants to feel at ease in the workplace and a policy that explains what is permissible is quite helpful.

  1. Confidentiality

Each company’s handbook should have wording that ensures your employee’s personal info will be kept confidential.   This should protect the info about them during and after they leave the company.

  1. Leave of Absence

Employees want to know the details about vacation days, sick days, bereavement, paid time off and the days a business closes.  Don’t assume that they will know what you mean.  Be very specific and include the hours of operation and specific dates that you are open and closed.

  1. Compensation and Benefits

Your employee handbook should explain the pay schedule, benefits package, overtime policy, review and salary increase information.  Try and be as direct and detailed in this as possible so that there will be fewer questions later.

If you don’t have an employee handbook for your company, then get that corrected quickly!  Set a goal and get one written.

Already have one?  Well pull it out, dust it off and see if these 7 “Must Haves” are in there.  A yearly revamp is a great idea to be sure that the handbook stays updated with the best info.

Take time right now to review your employee handbook is up to date. If you need any help or guidance, please let us know. We work in this area daily at The Lawton Group and we are Ready to Serve.

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Written for us by our associate Gary Sorrell, Sorrell Associates, LLC. Copyright protected. All rights reserved worldwide.

When Not To Pay Employees

February 28th, 2017

“This recent storm resulted in a loss of power at the shop so I closed early. I need to know whether or not I have to pay employees for the full day when it wasn’t my fault they couldn’t work.”

Doing the Right Thing in an Irrational Economy

July 16th, 2016

How do we reflect and encourage a commitment to “do the right thing” despite daily pressures make regaining or sustaining profitability our top priority?

A leader can start by admitting mistakes and encouraging other to do the same. Hiding findings or blaming others very often comes from a very natural need to protect ourselves from harm. The best companies understand this and work hard to foster open communication and avoid the tendency to make issues more complex than they are. Very often all it takes is a “gut check.” Put more simply: doing good, feels good.

Sometimes a commitment to values comes at a high short-term cost (admitting mistakes and fixing them is almost never without cost to the client or stakeholders.) But living by a set of values that focus on doing good by employees and customers creates a stronger company over the long haul.

Developing–and living with–a set of principles that guide decision making throughout an organization is no simple task. It involves the kind of soul-searching that not all people are prepared to engage in, especially in difficult economic times.

The value of doing good
I feel fortunate to be in a business where we can do well by doing good. As a staffing firm, the work we do impacts the lives of the people we touch in a powerful way. We must be ever vigilant and mindful of this impact. What impact do you have on the lives of others? I suspect it’s more than you realize. If you are a manager, do your employees understand your values and commitment to doing the right thing? As an employee, do you feel empowered to do what’s right, and admit mistakes along the way? Or is your first thought about how to mitigate the cost before understanding the impact on the lives of others?

Balancing work and life

“Quality of life” issues, such as balancing one’s work and personal lives, are still thorny issues at many firms. Thirty years ago, if you’d talked about these issues, management would question your commitment, or even your sanity. But most people are trying to balance their business lives with their personal lives, their professional needs with their health, social, and spiritual needs.

In these difficult times, there is a lot of pressure to work harder and longer, for the very real fear of losing ones job. Good business leaders know, however, that squeezing as much out of workers as possible, may increase productivity for the short-term, but is not sustainable for the long-term. Long-term profitability is sustained when employees are motivated and committed out of a sense of loyalty.

Managing for the short term as well as the long
As much as leaders understand that we must manage for the long term and keep employees happy, we must be realists and manage for the short term, as well–and that’s tough in the current economic environment. Just as people must manage their personal and work responsibilities, so, too, must companies balance their priorities –all companies must manage for the short term to some degree. We all need to understand the tradeoffs.

Of course, we would all love to work for a company that only manages for the long term, but that is not a reality today. Cash reserves have dwindled, and funding sources have tightened or disappeared altogether. Many of us are simply trying to keep the wolves at bay, and must ask more of ourselves, our colleagues and our employees. But we must not let our fears cause us to lose sight of our values and our commitments to do the right thing!

Shannon Erdell is the President of TLC Staffing and author of “Temporary Sanity: Managing Today’s Flexible Workforce”, SOCAA Publishing 1995. Headquartered in San Diego, with offices in Southern California and North Carolina, TLC Staffing is a 24 year old, multi-disciplined temporary and permanent placement firm. Their specialty divisions include: Business Services, Accounting and Finance, Legal, Human Resources, Engineering and IT. www.tlcstaffing.com 858-569-6260

Critical thinking . . .

June 11th, 2012

Speaking with colleagues and clients, it seems that many of us are still fire-fighting and have lost our edge as it regards to strategic and critical thinking. Although a bit simplistic, I found this artical interesting and a good starting point for getting back to leading versus reaction.  Some of the reader comments are very thought-provoking as well.

What kind of “what if” thinking have you practiced lately?

http://www.forbes.com/sites/work-in-progress/2012/03/27/how-to-develop-5-critical-thinking-types/

National Cost-per-Hire Standard

June 17th, 2011

http://hrstandardsworkspace.shrm.org/apps/group_public/document.php?document_id=3311&wg_abbrev=swpt06
 

 Many of you  may have seen this already – but in case not, I thought I’d post the attached recommended standard for your review 

I’m still pondering a question in my mind related to a piece that seems missing when evaluating recruitment costs. The question relates to if, and how, this national standard for cost-per-hire should be related to retention. How does one account for very low cost-per-hire but very high attrition rates, or vice versa?  

All the best,

Shannon Erdell, President

 

 
 

 
 
 

 

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